Soft. Eng. by trade, love technology and gadgets. Also doing a Masters in @UCDCompSci . Automate all the things! It's 9,8 straight down...
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Letters of ‘Financial Times’ founder Brendan Bracken for auction

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Material seen as ‘highly important’ as personal papers of Churchill ally destroyed after death








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dueyfinster
620 days ago
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Didn't know about this guy @paruss
Athlone, Ireland
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A programmer wrote scripts to secretly automate a lot of his job — and to automatically email his wife and make himself a latte

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Feet On Desk

There's a hilarious project that's popular on Github, the website that hosts all kinds of software that programmers want to share with each other. 

The project was shared by a programmer named Nihad Abbasov (known as "Narkoz" on GitHub). It consists of a bunch of software scripts with some funny, but NSFW names. Narkoz says that the scripts came from one of his coworkers who left for another company, the type of guy that, "if something — anything — requires more than 90 seconds of his time, he writes a script to automate that."

After the guy left for a new job, his former co-workers were looking through his work and discovered that the guy had automated all sorts of crazy things, including parts of his job, his relationships and making coffee. 

The guy wrote one script that sends a text message "late at work" to his wife and "automatically picks reasons" from a preset list of them, says Narkoz. It sent this text anytime there was activity with his login on the company's computer servers after 9 p.m.

He wrote another script relating to a customer he didn't like (given the not-very-nice name he chose for this script). It scans his inbox for an email from the customer that uses words like "help," "trouble," and "sorry" and automatically rolls the guy's database to the latest backup, then sends a reply: "No worries mate, be careful next time."

With another script, he automatically fired off an email excuse like "not feeling well, working from home" if he wasn't at work, logged into the servers by 8:45 a.m. (He called that script "hangover.")

And the best one? He wrote a script that waits exactly 17 seconds, then hacks into the coffee machine and orders it to start brewing a latte. The script tells the machine to wait another 24 seconds before pouring the latte into a cup, the exact time it takes it takes to walk from the guy's desk to the coffee machine.

And his coworkers didn't even know the coffee machine was on the network and was hack-able.

SEE ALSO: The one day a month when women most love sex, and other fun facts about making whoopee

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popular
631 days ago
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dueyfinster
631 days ago
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Athlone, Ireland
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7 public comments
tedder
631 days ago
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the idea was cute but the code was so fake. no way.
Uranus
expatpaul
631 days ago
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Heh
Belgium
fabuloso
631 days ago
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coder's dream.
Miami Beach, FL
dreadhead
632 days ago
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Seems like this guy should have got a raise.
Vancouver Island, Canada
MotherHydra
632 days ago
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Technology: doing it right.
Space City, USA
skittone
632 days ago
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Resourceful.
JayM
632 days ago
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Ha
Atlanta, GA

I Turned Off JavaScript in My Web Browser for a Whole Week and It Was Glorious

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There's another web out there, a better web hiding just below the surface of the one we surf from our phones and tablets and laptops every day. A web with no ads, no endlessly scrolling pages, and no annoying modal windows begging you to share the site on social media or sign up for a newsletter.

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dueyfinster
634 days ago
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Athlone, Ireland
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The secret to Zara's success

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A quick but fascinating look at the fast fashion retailer Zara.

Fashion used to be sold in four seasons. Zara wants you to buy for one-hundred-and-four. New clothes arrive in every store twice a week -- days known by fans as "Z Days" -- and fuel the need to turn over your wardrobe.

The brand's global distribution centre, also in Spain, moves 2.5 million items per week. Nothing remains warehoused longer than 72 hours.

The integration and feedback incorporated into their system is impressive. The knockoffs, not so much. Lots of parallels to Facebook here, not the least of which is both companies' founders are among the richest people in the world.

Tags: business   fashion   video   Zara
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dueyfinster
646 days ago
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Athlone, Ireland
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